You don’t see stories about knitting in the New York Times all that often, and this isn’t a news article, but an op-ed contributor wrote a really nice piece for the paper about what knitting means and what it does for those of us who do it — eventhose who don’t do it very well.

“Knitting My Way Home” is about Joy K√ľndig-Manning’s train trip across Switzerland, during which she literally knit her way home, working slowly on a purple mohair scarf. But it’s also about the generations of crafty ladies who came before, and how craft can be like the comforts of home, a reminder of the traditions you came from, even if you don’t always practice them yourself.

It’s also a great argument for people who’ve ever been criticized for knitting at a meeting or in public, noting that we tend to listen more intently when knitting than we might otherwise.

It’s a nice little story about what people see when they see knitters and what’s really going on. I hope you enjoy it!

By Sarah White




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